Oliver

La Barceloneta

4.000 € / month

Would you like to live in Barceloneta?
The neighbourhood settled on land reclaimed from the sea in the 15th century, on which the port breakwater was built (1474) and a slow sedimentation of land and sand from the Besòs and the adjacent coastline around the island of Maians, located approximately where the facilities of the station of France are located.
The most immediate precedent for the construction of the neighbourhood is the project of the Captain General Marquis of Castel-Rodrigo, who on October 3, 1718 determined the creation of the neighbourhood of La Playa, in order to house the citizens who had seen their houses demolished. on the occasion of the construction of the Citadel in the Ribera. This project was entrusted to the military engineer Pròsper Verboom.
The military engineer Juan Martín Cermeño, at the initiative of the Captain General Marquis de la Mina, began, in 1749, a new and definitive project that would respond in an exemplary way to a complex set of needs: to put an end to the disorganisation of the Arenal constructions and address the shortage of housing in the walled Barcelona, ​​anticipate the insufficiency of the mediaeval port and its facilities and also have military control of the population, based on a site with an unbeatable strategic position. The need to build the new neighbourhood as compensation for the demolition of the houses in the Ribera is cited secondarily.
The project envisaged a large urbanisation with an octagonal layout, made up of fifteen streets parallel to the port, 7.5 metres wide, crossed by three other transversal streets, 9.3 metres wide. The houses, with a ground floor and one floor, intended, in principle, for a single family and under ownership, were uniform in terms of dimensions (8.4 by 8.4 metres), materials, distribution and external decoration. They were lined up in extremely long and narrow rectangular blocks.
Until the middle of the 19th century, the activities of the inhabitants of Barceloneta were essentially related to the sea: fishing, port activities, the construction of sailboats and the manufacture and sale of gear. In 1846, the Barcelona City Council prohibited the installation of new industries with steam engines within the walled enclosure. Many of those that already existed and those that were newly created were built in the closest towns, outside the walls: Sants, Poblenou and Barceloneta. It was then that industrialization began to penetrate the neighbourhood. The proximity to the port, which facilitated the loading of heavy machinery and the unloading of raw materials, the building space, and since 1848, the Mataró railway station under the Mar portal, were elements that the industrialists took into account. In 1841, Barceloneta was already the second metallurgical town in Catalonia after Barcelona, ​​with the foundries and, above all, the Nueva Vulcano workshops (1836).

Would you like to live in Barceloneta?
The neighbourhood settled on land reclaimed from the sea in the 15th century, on which the port breakwater was built (1474) and a slow sedimentation of land and sand from the Besòs and the adjacent coastline around the island of Maians, located approximately where the facilities of the station of France are located.
The most immediate precedent for the construction of the neighbourhood is the project of the Captain General Marquis of Castel-Rodrigo, who on October 3, 1718 determined the creation of the neighbourhood of La Playa, in order to house the citizens who had seen their houses demolished. on the occasion of the construction of the Citadel in the Ribera. This project was entrusted to the military engineer Pròsper Verboom.
The military engineer Juan Martín Cermeño, at the initiative of the Captain General Marquis de la Mina, began, in 1749, a new and definitive project that would respond in an exemplary way to a complex set of needs: to put an end to the disorganisation of the Arenal constructions and address the shortage of housing in the walled Barcelona, ​​anticipate the insufficiency of the mediaeval port and its facilities and also have military control of the population, based on a site with an unbeatable strategic position. The need to build the new neighbourhood as compensation for the demolition of the houses in the Ribera is cited secondarily.
The project envisaged a large urbanisation with an octagonal layout, made up of fifteen streets parallel to the port, 7.5 metres wide, crossed by three other transversal streets, 9.3 metres wide. The houses, with a ground floor and one floor, intended, in principle, for a single family and under ownership, were uniform in terms of dimensions (8.4 by 8.4 metres), materials, distribution and external decoration. They were lined up in extremely long and narrow rectangular blocks.
Until the middle of the 19th century, the activities of the inhabitants of Barceloneta were essentially related to the sea: fishing, port activities, the construction of sailboats and the manufacture and sale of gear. In 1846, the Barcelona City Council prohibited the installation of new industries with steam engines within the walled enclosure. Many of those that already existed and those that were newly

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La Barceloneta